Journal of Medical Sciences

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 37  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 12--18

Increased risk of stroke in patients with atopic dermatitis: A population-based, longitudinal study in Taiwan


Yueh-Feng Sung1, Chun-Chieh Lin1, Jiu-Haw Yin2, Chung-Hsing Chou1, Chi-Hsiang Chung3, Fu-Chi Yang1, Chia-Kuang Tsai1, Chia-Lin Tsai1, Guan-Yu Lin1, Yu-Kai Lin1, Wu-Chien Chien5, Jiunn-Tay Lee1 
1 Department of Neurology, National Defense Medical Center, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
2 Department of Neurology, National Defense Medical Center, Tri-Service General Hospital; Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China
3 Taiwanese Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Association; National Defense Medical Center, School of Public Health; Department of Medical Research, National Defense Medical Center, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China

Correspondence Address:
Jiunn-Tay Lee
Department of Neurology, National Defense Medical Center, Tri-Service General Hospital, No. 325, Section 2, Cheng-Kung Road, Neihu District, Taipei 11490, Taiwan
Republic of China
Wu-Chien Chien
Department of Medical Research, National Defense Medical Center, Tri-Service General Hospital, No. 325, Section 2, Cheng-Kung Road, Neihu District, Taipei 11490, Taiwan
Republic of China

Background: Chronic inflammation has been linked to stroke, but it is not known whether atopic dermatitis (AD), a chronically inflammatory skin disease, is related to stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of AD and stroke. Materials and Methods: In this population-based, cohort study, data were collected from a Longitudinal Health Insurance Database released from the National Health Research Institute in Taiwan in 2011. All patients with AD between 2000 and 2006 without prior stroke were included and an age- and gender-matched cohort without prior stroke, 4-fold of the AD sample size, was served as the control group. The two cohorts were followed until the end of 2010 for stroke incidence. Cox's proportional hazards regressions were used to assess the difference in stroke risk between groups. Results: During the follow-up period of 4–11 years, 471 (incidence: 4.46/1,000 person-years) and 1497 (incidence: 3.56/1,000 person-years) stroke incidents were noted in the study and control cohort, respectively. The patients with AD had an increased incidence of ischemic stroke (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08–1.36) but not hemorrhagic stroke (adjusted HR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.74–1.29). The severity of AD was significantly correlated with the risk of ischemic stroke. Conclusions: These results suggest that AD is independently associated with ischemic stroke but not with hemorrhagic stroke. The risk of ischemic stroke is correlated significantly with the severity of AD. Further research is necessary to explore the underlying mechanism.


How to cite this article:
Sung YF, Lin CC, Yin JH, Chou CH, Chung CH, Yang FC, Tsai CK, Tsai CL, Lin GY, Lin YK, Chien WC, Lee JT. Increased risk of stroke in patients with atopic dermatitis: A population-based, longitudinal study in Taiwan.J Med Sci 2017;37:12-18


How to cite this URL:
Sung YF, Lin CC, Yin JH, Chou CH, Chung CH, Yang FC, Tsai CK, Tsai CL, Lin GY, Lin YK, Chien WC, Lee JT. Increased risk of stroke in patients with atopic dermatitis: A population-based, longitudinal study in Taiwan. J Med Sci [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 Feb 22 ];37:12-18
Available from: http://www.jmedscindmc.com/article.asp?issn=1011-4564;year=2017;volume=37;issue=1;spage=12;epage=18;aulast=Sung;type=0