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ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Evaluation of the management outcomes of primary mono-symptomatic nocturnal enuresis among sudanese children: A retrospective study


1 Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan
2 Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Omdurman Islamic University, Khartoum, Sudan
3 Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan

Correspondence Address:
Bashir Alsiddig Yousef,
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Khartoum, Al-Qasr Ave., Khartoum 11111
Sudan
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/jmedsci.jmedsci_68_20

Background: Nocturnal enuresis or bedwetting is the most common type of urinary incontinence in children. The wide prevalence of nocturnal enuresis speaks to the need for an improved understanding of this condition by others to improve the management plan. The management can be motivationally or pharmacologically. Our study aimed to evaluate the management outcomes of primary mono-symptomatic nocturnal enuresis among Sudanese children. Methods: A retrospective hospital-based survey was carried to assess 52 children aged 5–18 years (21:31 male: female ratio) and suffering from primary mono-symptomatic nocturnal enuresis. They divided into two groups; Group 1 (28 patients) were on desmopressin melt tablet 120 mcg once daily before bedtime, while Group 2 (24 patients) were on simple behavioral therapy. Data were collected by a well-designed checklist and analyzed using SPSS. Results: The wetting frequency decreased at the end of treatment by a total response rate of 96.4% with desmopressin and 75% with simple behavioral therapy. The complete response and partial response rate of desmopressin at the end of treatment were 89.3% and 7.1%, respectively. For simple behavioral therapy, the complete response and partial response rates at the end of treatment were 66.7% and 8.3%, respectively. The number of wet night per week at the end of 2 weeks of treatment among the two groups was statistically significant, with P = 0.025. Moreover, the relapse rate was higher with simple behavioral therapy (66.7%) than with desmopressin (57.1%). Conclusion: There is a highly significant decrease in wet nights in response to both desmopressin and simple behavioral therapy, both interventions were effective, desmopressin showed higher efficacy and associated with less relapse rate.


 

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    -  Yousif NE
    -  Badi S
    -  Yousef BA
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